Bodytech

There’s wearable tech now. There has been for a while. Clothing that contains sensors to take the body’s temperature, the heartrate, the blood pressure. There are items you can attach to yourself or your own clothing for other things, like music or spoken word or radio. For detecting radiation. Google’s now cancelled Glass. Electronic devices for nearly every use we can device.
Most of them have common everyday names: iPod, Discman, portable radio, heart monitor, pedometer [not for measuring pedophiles] and so on. Even mobile phones can be connected to ‘smart’ watches and headsets so you barely have to even touch the phone. On the lowtech side of things we’ve had spectacles and prosthetic limbs for decades.
Then there is the tech that is placed inside you. Pacemakers for people with heart problems. Dialysis equipment for filtering blood simply. Artificial organs, bionic senses, the list goes on. On the lowtech side again you still have things like metal plates and splints and joint replacements, things that are there for good. Even false teeth, once wood, are now ceramic and sometimes permanently attached.

What you don’t usually hear about are the less popular kinds of tech. The ones people have to do outside hospitals and anaesthesia and sterile surgeries for various reasons. Most of them legal.
There are a few people walking these paths with those advantages, but they are few and far between. Stellarc, the Australian based physical performance artist, is one of them: having robot arms linked to his nerves, growing ears with the intent of making them fully functioning. The rest have to make do. Opening you up to insert an object that could theoretically kill you isn’t a job just anyone will do, let alone even can do.

And it’s something I’ve been personally intrigued by for a long time.
Anywa, here’s the article, “Cyborg America: inside the strange new world of basement body hackers,” from The Verge. Go read it. And wonder with me on just how useful it would be to have a magnet inside your finger.

I think I’m good on shows right now

Lots happening this time around. There’s even been an effort put into getting this posted somewhat on time. Medals, congratulatory claps and cheers all round. Or not. Whatever.

There’s a pretty random collection of things today — from parody to serious and from music to maths — creeps and algorithms, robots and scanners, secure computers and girls names, lists and education methods, cardboard boxes and dinosaurs, lists and umbrellas, apples and wolverines, and starting with cops and cameras:

Yeah, I’ve got an hour till raid

So, this is late again. Because reasons and bacon and frogs’ legs. And candy. Delicious candy.

Random stuff in here, from the past couple of weeks. Nothing much since has been that interesting. People spying on people like it’s a surprise, and the same old same old. Read through and tell us what is actually in here. It should be good.

Just going through these links quickly there’s a lot of funnies and less serious stuff.

Because yesterday she had her leg bitten off by a shark

And we’re back. Not on schedule, because that is something that will never happen, and everybody knows it. Instead we have a smattering of articles from the past few weeks. Breaking Bad and Wonder Woman, productivity and social media, massage and horoscopes, language and mathematics, drugs and card games, televisions and games, sphinxes and salamanders ducksand octopusses, oh my! This one contains almost everything, with a few obvious exceptions …

But first, some Bowie, but not for the usual reasons:

Creation

Because it is possible to create … one has anxiety. One would have no anxiety if there were no possibility whatever creating, actualising one’s possibilities … always involves destroying the status quo, destroying old patterns within oneself. Progressively destroying what one has clung to from childhood on, and creating new and original forms and ways of living. If one does not do this, one is refusing to grow, refusing to avail himself of his possibilties; one is shirking his responsibility to himself.
— Søren Kierkegaard